Katie About

Q&A with Katie Greer – Online Safety Expert

Katie L. Greer has provided nearly a decade of Internet/technology safety education to schools, law enforcement agencies, community organizations and at national conferences throughout the United States and Canada. Her unique professional, educational and personal background has resulted in dynamic programs that appeal to all age groups.

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Nov-9 12:51 PM

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Here's more information about Katie and the work she does with kids, parents and schools around the country.
Katie L. Greer of KL Greer Consulting
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Nov-9 1:08 PM

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.@katielgreer on the Meredith Show discussing #internetsafety
The Meredith Vieira Show: How To Keep Your Kids Safe on Social Media
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Nov-10 1:22 PM

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Tips on internet safety provided by Katie on Modern Mom web site.
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Nov-11 1:49 PM

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We're pleased to welcome @KatieLGreer to AnswerStage. Katie will be fielding questions in about 10 mins.
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Nov-11 2:00 PM

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What are the guidelines that parents should give kids about their use of social media?
KatieLGreer

Nov-11 2:00 PM

KatieLGreer

I think social media can be awesome for kids – and even parents to connect with their kids. One of the major things I like parents to talk about (even before their kids are on social media) is to be proud of and own what they post. They need to know that they’re creating a searchable brand for themselves that can easily be a really good – or really bad thing, even with one post. It seems as if kids (and even some adults) have this illusion that nobody else but family and friends are interested in their posts, likes and social media interests, without fully realizing that these public forums are also of potential interest to future employers, college admissions, etc. Another major point I’d like parents to discuss is not connecting with people they don’t know. Given the popularity contest-nature of some of these networks, it should be one of the top rules parents enforce.
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Nov-11 2:04 PM

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Is there a tool or app that I can use to track what my kids are doing?
KatieLGreer

Nov-11 2:04 PM

KatieLGreer

There are apps out there that allow you track every single click, drag, post, text, etc. your kids’ make – and I don’t recommend any of them. Many of these apps sell the information they collect from your kids and sell it to 3rd parties. Additionally, it’s merely a band aid to the larger issues; no tool or app will ever replace parents being actively involved and engaged in what their kids are doing.
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Nov-11 2:11 PM

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Is it OK for a 14 year old to be using Snapchat?
KatieLGreer

Nov-11 2:11 PM

KatieLGreer

I’m actually OK with it. I unsuccessfully fought the Snapchat fight with kids for about 1.5 years. I decided to get an account of my own to see what the lure was and I must admit – I totally get it…and love it. My major rule with Snapchat is that kids (and adults!) shouldn’t be using Snapchat if their intention is for these pics/videos/messages to disappear for eternity. It defies all technological logic, and with a simple screenshot, that picture that you wanted to disappear into the abyss is on my phone, being shared on all my social networks.
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Nov-11 2:18 PM

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Are there specific apps that I should refuse to let my child use?
KatieLGreer

Nov-11 2:18 PM

KatieLGreer

First I’d like to note that there are so many great, fun, educational apps out there that kids can be using. While these apps change on a daily basis, a few I’m hearing a lot about now have been extremely problematic, inappropriate, and even dangerous. Omegle (live video chat with strangers), Flinch (live video chat with strangers – with a game element to it), and Kik (think of it like text messaging functionality – with strangers). For kids, any of these apps that promote talking with strangers are dangerous and have been extremely problematic in my experience.
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Nov-11 2:26 PM

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I heard that photos my child posts with his phone can reveal the location of our home. Is there a way to disable this?
KatieLGreer

Nov-11 2:26 PM

KatieLGreer

Absolutely, and it seems like this feature is something that inevitably makes jaws drop. We’re always prompted to “enable location” for apps we add and use, and when we do this (and even sometimes right out of the box these settings are enabled), anytime we perform a function on these apps – like taking a picture, posting something on a social network – our location (exact coordinates) is attached to that action. It’s VERY important that we disable these location services for anything we don’t sensibly need a GPS to function (i.e. Maps, running apps, GPS apps). To do this, go into the settings of your phone under location services, and disable them for non-GPS related apps. Make sure you do this for your devices, and your kids!
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Nov-11 2:34 PM

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Are there any good videos or books that you recommend that we can watch or read together to help facilitate a conversation about online safety?
KatieLGreer

Nov-11 2:34 PM

KatieLGreer

Recently, @CNN @AndersonCooper just ran a featured entitled #Being13 and it was one of the absolute best things I’ve ever seen on online safety. It features a bunch of really hot online safety topics – but all through the eyes and accounts of a group of thirteen-year-olds. It’s hard to explain “why” to parents, and this feature really dug into a lot of the reasons why, directly from the source. This generational gap is really problematic, because if parents can’t understand why, often the approaches in facilitating productive and safe experiences are missing the mark. Every parent of a digital native – no matter how old – should see this feature.
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Nov-11 2:40 PM

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Many thanks for taking the time to field questions on AnswerStage. We appreciate it!
Nov-11 2:46 PM

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